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Mas Hdlife Rot
 
Contact

Dr. Anne Sommer

Office hours:
Tuesdays, 3 - 4 p.m.
and by appointment

T: + 49 (0)6221 / 54 3713
F: + 49 (0)6221 / 54 3719

mas@uni-hd.de

 
News

MAS Newsletter 2/2016:
The American Dream Lives Large at the HCA

This edition features the HCA’s commencement celebration for the B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. classes of 2016. Current MAS student Jessica Hagen writes about her life alongside the MAS. Ana Maric-Curry (MAS Class of 2011) shares how her academic and personal life have evolved after the MAS. Finally, Zachary Holler, a current MAS student, reports about the first student conference at the HCA, where he participated in the panel discussion about the American Dream in the 21st century.

 
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Faculty

Baker

Millie Baker

Presentation and Media Skills

milliebaker@web.de
+49 (0)6221-54 37 10

Heidelberg Center for American Studies
Hauptstraße 120
69117 Heidelberg

Millie Baker studied English and German philology and received her Master of Arts degree from Heidelberg University. Originally from London, she has been working in Germany since 1999 as a trainer for academic and business English, translator, and workshop facilitator for communication skills. Millie creates and carries out interactive workshops for researchers and doctoral candidates across the disciplines, combining academic communication skills with the English language to create specialized courses in presenting, writing and networking. Millie is coauthor of Schlüsselkompetenzen: Qualifikationen für Studium und Beruf (Handbuch für Geistes und Kulturwissenschaften – Key Competencies Handbook for Humanities and Cultural Studies). Her courses are currently run at the German Cancer Research Centre, the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, and in various departments at the Universities of Berlin, Frankfurt, Konstanz, Heidelberg, and Vienna.

 

Berg

Prof. Dr. Manfred Berg

History

manfred.berg@zegk.uni-heidelberg.de
+49 6221 54 2477

History Department
Grabengasse 3-5
69117 Heidelberg

Manfred Berg is the Curt Engelhorn Professor of American History at Heidelberg University and a specialist in the history of the African American civil rights movement. His book The Ticket to Freedom: The NAACP and the Struggle for Black Political Integration was published in 2005 by the University Press of Florida. In 2006 Manfred Berg received the David Thelen Award of the Organization of American Historians for his essay “Civil Rights and Liberal Anticommunism: The NAACP during the Early Cold War,” which was published in the June 2007 issue of the Journal of American History. In addition, Professor Berg has published ten more monographs and edited volumes and over forty scholarly articles in both English and German on various aspects of American and German history. Before he was appointed professor of American history at Heidelberg, he taught at the Free University of Berlin and was a research fellow (1992-1997) at the German Historical Institute, Washington, D.C., among other positions. In 2009 he served as the Lewis P. Jones Professor of History at Wofford College, Spartanburg, South Carolina.

 

Gregg Culver, Ph.D.

Geography

culver@uni-heidelberg.de
+49 6221 / 54 5578

Geographisches Institut
Berliner Straße 48
69120 Heidelberg

Gregg Culver received his PhD in Geography from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 2014. His dissertation research involved two controversial non-automobile transportation projects in Wisconsin, with particular focus on how the competing interests, beliefs, normative values, and social meanings that are associated with transport and mobility influence the politics and outcomes of such projects. Since completing the PhD, he has been working as a research assistant at the Institute of Geography, Heidelberg, where he has continued research on auto mobility, the city, and social injustice, particularly in the United States. His upcoming Habilitation project, funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgesellschaft, uses the empirical example of the re-emergence of streetcar development projects in cities throughout the United States, along with theoretical approaches from urban, transport, and mobility’s geographies to investigate whether and how neoliberal “creative city” strategies impact the production and politics of local mobility regimes, and what this means for concerns over ever-increasing urban social inequalities.

 

Mausbach

Dr. Wilfried Mausbach

Interdisciplinary Colloquium

wmausbach@hca.uni-heidelberg.de
+49-6221 54 3712

Heidelberg Center for American Studies
Hauptstraße 120
69117 Heidelberg

Wilfried Mausbach received his Ph.D. from the University of Cologne where he studied history, political science and philosophy. He has been a reaseach fellow at the German Historical Institute in Washington, D.C. and has held assistant professorships in history at both the John F. Kennedy Institute for North American Studies at the Free University Berlin and at Heidelberg University, where he has also been a Volkswagen Foundation fellow. His major research interests are in transnational and intercultural history with a focus on German-American relations during the twentieth century. He is the author of Zwischen Morgenthau und Marshall: Das wirtschaftspolitische Deutschlandkonzept der USA 1944-1947 (1996); co-editor of America, the Vietnam War, and the World. Comparative and International Perspectives (2003); and of Changing the World, Changing Oneself: Political Protest and Collective Identities in West Germany and the U.S. in the 1960s and 1970s (2010). Since 2005 he is the Executive Director of the HCA.

 

Nagl

Everett Messamore, M.A.

TA History

emessamore@hca.uni-heidelberg.de
+49 (0)6221-54 37 10

Heidelberg Center for American Studies
Hauptstraße 120
69117 Heidelberg

Everett Messamore was born in Winnipeg, Canada in 1986. He received his B.A. in history from Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, British Columbia in 2009. During this time, he worked as a research assistant on a Canadian history textbook. After graduation, he spent the a few years working at the British Columbia Automobile Association. He plays and composes music in his spare time and practices Aikido. At the HCA, his M.A. thesis was entitled “Andrew Jackson Davis, American Spiritualism, and the Idea of Universal Religion,” and he majored in religious studies, history, and literature. He is currently expanding the scope of his previous research into a Ph.D. dissertation tentatively entitled “Spiritualism and the Language of Universal Religion in Nineteenth-Century America,” which he is writing with the support of the research group “Globale Religionsgeschichte aus regionaler Perspektive: Historisierung und Dezentrierung religiöser Identitäten im 19. und frühen 20. Jahrhundert.” (Global Religious History from a Regional Perspective: Historicizing and Decentering Religious Identities in the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries).

 

Nagl

Hannes Nagl, M.A.

Methodology

hnagl@hca.uni-heidelberg.de
+49 (0)6221-54 38 82

Heidelberg Center for American Studies
Hauptstraße 120
69117 Heidelberg

Hannes Nagl studied English and American literature and political science at Heidelberg University. After graduating in 2009, he joined the HCA’s Ph.D. program working on a thesis on “Figurations of Violence: Contemporary American Fiction and the Sociology of Modernization.” From August 2010 to July 2011 he was a research assistant at the English Department of Heidelberg University as part of the research project “Violence and the Hidden Constraints of Democracy: A New Civilization Studies Approach to American Literature and Culture.” At the HCA he teaches American literature and is responsible for the institute’s website.

 

Nagl

Natalie Rauscher, M.A.

TA Political Science

nrauscher@hca.uni-heidelberg.de
+49 (0)6221-54 37 10

Heidelberg Center for American Studies
Hauptstraße 120
69117 Heidelberg

Natalie Rauscher began her studies in Heidelberg in 2009. She received her B.A. in 2013 in English Literature, Linguistics and Cultural Studies as well as Political Science. Following her interest in American culture and language she spent one year in the US at St. Mary’s College of Maryland, taking courses in literature, American history and Political Science. After her B.A. she wanted to pursue her interest in the US by joining the MAS program at the HCA in Heidelberg where she earned her Master’s degree in 2015. In her Master’s project she looked into the influences of social movements on political decision-making with her thesis “The Occupy Movement and its Influence on the Political Discourse in the United States.” Natalie is currently a PhD student at the HCA working on her dissertation on “The changing discourse on social inequality in the US under the influence of the sharing economy and digitization.” Natalie is interested in topics concerning American politics and history and enjoys reading American fiction.

 

Schloss _2_

Prof. Dr. Dietmar Schloss

Literature

dietmar.schloss@urz.uni-heidelberg.de
+49 6221 54-2834

English Department
Kettengasse 12
69117 Heidelberg

Dietmar Schloss teaches American literature and culture at the English Department of Heidelberg University. He holds a Ph.D. from Northwestern University and a postdoctroal degree (Habilitation) from Heidelberg University. As a fellow of the American Council of Learned Societies, he was a visiting scholar at the English and History Departments at Harvard University. He has published widely in the fields of eighteenth-, nineteenth- and twentiethcentury American literature and culture; his book The Virtuous Republic (2003) examines the political visions of American writers during the founding period of the United States. In 2009, he published a volume of conference proceedings entitled Civilizing America: Manners and Civility in American Literature and Culture as well as a collection of critical essays on the contemporary American novel. In his new project, entitled “Spaces of Decivilization,” he explores the phenomenon of violence in American literature and culture form the vantage point of Norbert Elias’ sociological theory.

 

Sch _ler

Dr. Anja Schüler

Methodology

aschueler@hca.uni-heidelberg.de
+49-6221 54 3879

Heidelberg Center for American Studies
Hauptstraße 120
69117 Heidelberg

Anja Schüler studied history, English, and journalism at the University of Münster, the University of Georgia in Athens, and the Free University Berlin, where she earned an M.A. in American History. She was a DAAD Fellow at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis and lived in Washington, D.C. for several years. She received her Ph.D. from the Free University of Berlin in 2000. She is the author of Frauenbewegung und soziale Reform: Jane Addams und Alice Salomon im transatlantischen Dialog, 1889-1933 (2004), the co-editor of Social Justice Feminists in the United States and Germany: A Dialogue in Documents, 1885-1933 (1997), and Politische Netzwerkerinnen: Internationale Zusammenarbeit von Frauen 1830-1960 (2007). Her research interests include German and American social history, gender history, and transatlantic history. From 2006 to 2010, she taught at the University of Education in Heidelberg. Starting in 2006, she has been teaching academic writing at the HCA. Since 2009, she has also been coordinating HCA events, including the Baden-Württemberg Seminar, and is responsible for public relations.

 

Sommer _anne

Dr. Anne Sommer

Interdisciplinary Colloquium

asommer@hca.uni-heidelberg.de
+49 6221 / 54 3713

Heidelberg Center for American Studies
Haupstraße 120
69117 Heidelberg

Anne Sommer studied political science, German philology, English, and Romance languages at Heidelberg University and the University of Bologna, Italy. She interned at the German Foreign Office, Berlin and at the Goethe Institute in Paris. After receiving her M.A. in 2006, she began work on her doctoral dissertation, making research trips to Italy, France, and Switzerland. She earned her Ph.D. in 2013 with her dissertation on “Alfieri, Foscolo, and Manzoni as Readers of Machiavelli: Intertextuality and Reception in the Early Risorgimento.” Sommer has worked for the HCA since 2003. From 2003 to 2007, she was responsible for organizing and convening the Spring Academy and the Baden-Württemberg-Seminar. She has served as MAS coordinator since 2007. In 2010, she was instrumental in developing and implementing the B.A. program at the HCA. After lecturing at the Romance language department, Anne Sommer now teaches American literature seminars at the HCA and conducts workshops on intercultural competence. She developed a concept of research-oriented teaching that has been competitively funded by the university as part of the program “Welcome to Research.” In addition, she is the editor of the online journal “HeLix –Heidelberger Beiträge zur romanischen Literaturwissenschaft” and the book series “HeLix im Winter,” published by Winter Verlag.

 

Tim Sommer

TA Literature

+49 6221 / 54 3710

Heidelberg Center for American Studies
Haupstraße 120
69117 Heidelberg

Tim Sommer studied English, American, and German literature and culture at Heidelberg University and the University of Edinburgh. He received his M.A. in 2016 with a thesis on mid-nineteenth-century American literary criticism and its transatlantic contexts. Research brought him to the Universities of Cambridge (King’s College) and Oxford (Bodleian Library). He has delivered conference papers at Oxford, Boston, San Francisco, and Yale, among others, and is the recipient of the 2016 Ralph Waldo Emerson Society Graduate Student Paper Award. His research interests include New England Transcendentalism, nineteenth-century Anglo-American literary relations, and cultural sociology. He has been working as a student research assistant and undergraduate tutor at the Heidelberg English Department since 2011.

 

Stievermann

Prof. Dr. Jan Stievermann

Theology/Religious Studies

jstievermann@hca.uni-heidelberg.de
+49 6221 54 3881

Heidelberg Center for American Studies
Hauptstraße 120
69117 Heidelberg

Jan Stievermann came to the HCA in April 2011 as a joint appointment with the Faculty of Theology at Heidelberg University. He has published on a broad range of topics in the fields of American religious history and American literature, including articles for Early American Literature and William and Mary Quarterly. His book Der Sündenfall der Nachahmung: Zum Problem der Mittelbarkeit im Werk Ralph Waldo Emersons (2007) is a comprehensive study of the co-evolution of Emerson’s religious and aesthetic thought. Together with Reiner Smolinski, he published Cotton Mather and Biblia Americana – America’s First Bible Commentary (2010). He is currently at work on a book, tentatively titled The Ethnic Fantastic that examines issues of spirituality in contemporary ethnic minority literatures. Concurrently, he leads a DFG-funded team transcribing and editing vol. 5 of Cotton Mather’s hitherto unpublished Biblia Americana, the first comprehensive Bible commentary produced in British North America. He also serves as the executive editor for the Biblia project as a whole (10 vols.) and as the director of the Jonathan Edwards Center Germany.

 

Thunert

PD Dr. Martin Thunert

Political Science

mthunert@hca.uni-heidelberg.de
+49 6221 54 3877

Heidelberg Center for American Studies
Hauptstraße 120
69117 Heidelberg

Martin Thunert joined the HCA as research lecturer in political science in September 2007. He is a graduate of Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe University Frankfurt, holds a doctoral degree from the University of Augsburg, and received his habilitation in political science from the University of Hamburg, where he was an assistant professor. Martin Thunert was an exchange student at the University of Glasgow, Scotland and did graduate work at Queen’s University, Kingston, Ont. and at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec. He has held appointments in political science at several German universities and spent four years (2002-2006) as Visiting Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He was a Kennedy-Fellow at the Harvard Center for European Studies and has gained practical experience as staff assistant at the U.S. Senate (Labor, Education, and Health Committee).

 

Thunert

Cosima Werner, M.A.

TA Geography

cosimawerner@gmx.de
+49 6221 54 3710

Geographisches Institut
Berliner Straße 48
69120 Heidelberg

Cosima Werner joined Professor Gerhard’s team as Ph.D. student in 2015. She started her studies in 2007 with B.Sc. Geography, later combined with a second bachelor in sociology. For her master’s studies in cultural geography, her path continued then to the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg. During a year abroad, she studied at the Minnesota State University and then traveled for an internship to Jakarta, Indonesia. In 2015, she completed her studies with her master’s thesis on the variety of urban agriculture practices in Detroit. In her dissertation she will focus on the importance of liquor stores in American urban food deserts. Her scientific interests lie in the areas of food geography, urban geography, and urban sociology as well as in the methodology of empirical social research.

 

Wilke

Cynthia Wilke, J.D.

Law

cynthiawilke@t-online.de
+ 49 6221 / 54 3877

Heidelberg Center for American Studies
Hauptstraße 120
69117 Heidelberg

Cynthia Wilke lectures on the United States legal system at the Law School of Heidelberg University and the EBS University (i.Gr.) for Business and Law in Wiesbaden. She was born and raised near Chicago, Illinois. She graduated from Knox College in Galesburg, Illinois with a degree in modern languages and received her J.D. degree from Northwestern University School of Law. She practiced law in Chicago and worked as a civilian attorney with the United States Army in Frankfurt in the area of procurement law. She has lived and studied in Barcelona and Heidelberg.

 

Hasan Adwan, M.A.

TA Political Science

Hasan Adwan was born in Gaza City, Palestine, in 1985. He received the International Baccalaureate in Norway at the Red Cross Nordic United World College in 2004. In 2005, he was awarded the Davis-UWC scholarship to study in the U.S. He received a Bachelor of Arts from Westminster College with a double major in political science, with emphasis on political philosophy and American history. He wrote a bachelor thesis entitled “The Evolution of Basque Nationalism.” After completing his bachelor studies he moved to Germany where he attended the HCA and earned a master’s degree. His master thesis dealt with U.S. For­eign Aid to the Palestinian Authority. After completing his master’s degree, Hasan joined the HCA’s Ph.D. program. He is interested in American history, constitutional law, and American foreign policy.

 

Rashida Braggs, PhD

American Culture

Rashida K. Braggs received a Ph.D. in Performance Studies at Northwestern University; she was also awarded an M.S. in Mass Communications from Boston University and a B.A. in English and Theater Studies from Yale University. Braggs recently served as a postdoctoral fellow in the Introduction to Humanities Program at Stanford University, where she taught in conjunction with Drama, American Studies, and African American Studies. In her book project, Before Jazz Was American: Exploring the Changing Identity of Jazz in Post-WWII Paris, she problematizes the idea that jazz is uniquely American by investigating collaborations between African American musicians and their French counterparts in postwar France. Braggs has published in Nottingham French Studies and The Journal of Popular Music Studies. Her scholastic interests have strongly influenced her extracurricular activities, as she has performed in poetry slams and jazz jam sessions.

 

Fiona Breitkopf

TA Geography

Fiona Breitkopf, who is a trained kindergarten and remedial teacher, studied German language and literature, Political Science and Geography at the University of Heidelberg. Currently, she is in the process of completing her thesis “A dynamic Water Market – Successful Neoliberal Experiment in the Chilean State?”, as well as finishing her studies in English language and literature. She has been teaching English, German, Political Science, Geography and German as a foreign language at the Heidelberger Pädagogium. Her subjects of interest include: urban geography, culture and conflict in global perspective and how spatialities are ‘constructed’ in spatial policy discourses.

 

Dr. Christian Broecking

Musicology

Christian Broecking is a sociologist and musicologist, who graduated with an Dipl.-Soz. in sociology from the Free University in Berlin. He received his Dr. phil. from the Technische Universität Berlin (TUB) with a thesis titled “Der Marsalis-Komplex. Studien zur gesellschaftlichen Relevanz des afroamerikanischen Jazz zwischen 1992 und 2007,” which was published subsequently by TUB (Digitales Repositorium) and Broecking Verlag in 2011. Besides teaching at the HCA, Broecking is a lecturer at the Winterthurer Institut für aktuelle Musik, TUB and Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg. He has written about American culture and Afro-American jazz, including articles for Reclams Jazzlexikon. His books Der Marsalis-Faktor (1995), Respekt (2004), Black Codes (2005) and Jeder Ton eine Rettungsstation (2007) dealt with problems of racism, music and transculturality. His most recent books are Herbie Hancock – Interviews (2010), Ornette Coleman – Klang der Freiheit (2010) and Sonny Rollins – Improvisation und Protest (2010). Broecking served as the founding program director for Berlin jazz radio from 1994 to 1998. His published articles on music and cultural studies have appeared in scholarly journals and edited volumes, he holds columns in several daily newspapers in Germany and serves as a staff writer for the online music section of Die Zeit. He is editing and producing radio features on jazz and Afro-American culture for German public radio since 1995.

 

Dr. John Deni

Political Science

A native of Philadelphia, Dr. Deni completed his undergraduate degree in history and international relations at the College of William & Mary in 1992.  He went on to earn a Master of Arts degree in U.S. foreign policy at American University in Washington, DC in 1994, and a doctoral degree in international affairs at George Washington University in 2005.  Since 2003, Dr. Deni has worked as a political advisor for U.S. military forces in Europe.  Prior to that, he worked for two years as a strategic planner specializing in the military-to-military relationship between the United States and its European allies.  Before coming to Germany, Dr. Deni spent seven years in Washington, DC as a consultant specializing in national security issues for the U.S. Departments of Defense, Energy, and State.  He is the author most recently of the book Alliance Management and Maintenance: Restructuring NATO for the 21st Century, and since 2006 Dr. Deni has been an adjunct lecturer at Heidelberg University’s Institute for Political Science.

 

Maria Diaconu, M.A.

TA Literature

Maria Diaconu received her B.A. in English and American Studies from the University of Bucharest with a thesis on the Beat generation writers and the American avant-garde. Specializing in American literature, she graduated from the American Studies M.A. program of the HCA with a comparative study of authors Toni Morrison and William Faulkner. Currently, she is in the process of completing her dissertation tentatively entitled “Avatars of Liberalism in the 9/11 Novel.”  As an American literature and culture lecturer, she has also been teaching at the English Department of the University of Heidelberg. Her subjects of interest include: 9/11 literature, cultural memory, liberalism and the arts, the avant-garde, consumerism and cultural change. 

 

Kirsten Fischer

History

Kirsten Fischer received her master's and doctoral degrees in history from Duke University in North Carolina. After six years at the University of South Florida in Tampa, she assumed first an assistant, and in 2002 an associate professorship at the University of Minnesota, where she teaches American colonial history and the history of the Early Republic. Her principal research interests are race, gender, and sexuality in early America and American religious history. During her stay at the Heidelberg Center for American Studies, she will be working on her current book project "Reason and Wonder: Rational Religion in the Early American Republic."

 

Dr. Dorothea Fischer-Hornung

Methodology

Dorothea Fischer-Hornung is Senior Lecturer in the English Department of Heidelberg University. Her re­search focuses on ethnic literatures and film in English as well as performance theories and practices. She has developed, taught, and published on international e-learning cooperations with universities in numer­ous countries. She is founding co-editor of the journal Atlantic Studies and president of MESEA, Society for Multi-Ethnic Studies: Europe and the Americas.

 

Prof. Dr. Erich Geldbach

Religious Studies 

Prof. Dr. Erich Geldbach studied Protestant theology and English philology at the Philipps-University Mar­burg and received his D.D. in 1969. After his habilitation in 1974 Geldbach was a professor at Philipps- University Marburg and held visiting professorships at the Harvard Divinity School, Cambridge, Mass., the Eastern Baptist Seminary, Philadelphia, and the Whitney College in Melbourne. From 1997 until 2004 Geldbach was a professor of ecumenical studies at Ruhr-University Bochum.

 

PD Dr. Marcus Gräser

History

Marcus Gräser is currently substituting in the Chair for American History at the University of Heidelberg. He studied History, Sociology and Political Science in Frankfurt. From 1996 to 2009 he served as research associate and Habilitationsstipendiat at the Center for North American Studies at the University of Frankfurt. In 1996/97, 1998 and 2006/07 he was a visiting scholar at the Department of History at the University of Chicago. Recently he has published his ‘second book’, which is a comparative history of welfare state building in the U.S. and in Germany, 1880-1940. In 2008, he has won the David Thelen Award of the Organization of American Historians for his article “World History in a Nation-State”, published by the Historische Zeitschrift.

 

Martin Holler

TA Geography

Martin Holler was born in Mannheim, Germany in 1986. He received his general qualification for university entrance at the Carl-Benz-Gymnasium Ladenburg in 2005. After his civilian service at Caritas Mannheim he enrolled at Heidelberg University in 2006. His major subject was Geography; his minor subjects were Cultural Anthropology and Urban Planning. During the academic year of 2009/2010 Martin was part of the Baden-Württemberg Exchange Program and was a student at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. His diploma thesis was entitled “Urbane Ungleichheit in Stockton, California – Eine qualitative Analyse zur Wahrnehmung, Erfahrung und Sichtbarkeit”. Martin is interested in American cities, social geography and urban development.

 

Jeannette Eileen Jones

History

Jeannette Eileen Jones received her B.A. in History, with minors in Philosophy and Political Science from Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York. She earned her Master’s and Doctoral degrees in History from the State University of New York at Buffalo. She joined the UNL faculty in 2004 and is currently Assistant Professor of History and Ethnic Studies (African American and African Studies). Her teaching specializations are in African American history and the history of pre-colonial Africa. Her research focuses on American cultural and intellectual history, with emphases on race and representation in science, film, and popular culture.

 

Walther Kraft

American Business Culture / Marketing

Walther Kraft studied Philosophy, Literature, Political Sciences and Musical Sciences in Frankfurt am Main. His special scientific interest is the interdisciplinary inquiry on the logic of conservative movements. He is also a specialist for European media marketing, global advertising and below-the-line communications. He has worked for more than 30 years in the communications business: as head of marketing at SAT.1, Germany’s second biggest private TV network, as well as in some worldwide networks for marketing communications such as Ogilvy & Mather, EuroRSCG and Leo Burnett. Walther Kraft also consults for international corporations and takes over the training of marketing departments in various subjects such as marketing effectiveness measurement, client profiling, customer relationship marketing, and brand campaigning. At the same time, he has long been active as a lecturer at several universities and colleges, including the University of Bucharest and the Hochschule fuer Musik Hanns Eisler in Berlin. From 1999 to 2005, he taught European Media Marketing, Marketing in Eastern Europe and Global Below-The-Line Marketing as a visiting lecturer at the Johnson Graduate School of Management of the Cornell University in Ithaca/ New York. Since 2006 he has been teaching American and international business culture, marketing driven literature and marketing driven music at the Heidelberg Center for American Studies of the University of Heidelberg.

 

Dr. Steven Less, Esq.

Law

Dr. Less is a senior research fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law in Heidelberg, where he is also employed as the managing editor of the MPI’s semi-annual bibliography of public international law. A member of the New Jersey and New York bar associations, Less worked for a general practice law firm before coming to Heidelberg on a DAAD grant. Beginning in 1999, he has offered a three-semester introduction to Anglo-American law and legal terminology, covering American constitutional law, at the University of Heidelberg. He has also lectured on Anglo-American civil law in the same context. In addition, Less has taught international law and international human rights at Schiller International University in Heidelberg. He obtained an undergraduate degree in history from Middlebury College in Vermont. After receiving a law degree from Seton Hall University School of Law in New Jersey, Less completed his doctorate at the University of Heidelberg with the support of a Max Planck Society fellowship. His comparative law doctoral thesis concerned involuntary commitment to psychiatric institutions in the United States and Germany. Less has also written articles on American and international law, including an extensive survey of American law on terrorism and, most recently, a case study on the international administration of Holocaust reparations.

 

Anja Milde, M.A.

TA History

Anja Milde received her B.A. in Philology and Communication Science in 2003 from the University of Erfurt. Since fall 2003, she has been a student at Heidelberg University, majoring in history and art history. Before joining the HCA‘s Master program in 2007, she spent a year on a Fulbright scholarship at Trinity College in Hartford, CT, where she majored in American Studies and after which she interned at the German Historical Institute in Washington, DC. During her studies, she specialized in American history, politics and constitutional law with a particular focus on social movements in the U.S. She is currently working on her Ph.D. thesis on the linkages between the civil and gay rights movements. In 2009-10, Anja spent seven months in the U.S. researching her dissertation and conducting a series of interviews with leading figures of both movements, politicians, and intellectuals. Since fall 2007, Anja Milde has been working at the HCA as a public relations assistant and tutor for Ameri­can history, In March 2010, she took on the position of Spring Academy coordinator

 

Patrick S. Roberts, Ph.D.

Political Science

Patrick S. Roberts, the 2010-11 Ghaemian Fellow-in-Residence at the HCA is an assistant professor with the Center for Public Administration and Policy (CPAP) in the School of Public and International Affairs at Virginia Tech University. He holds a Ph.D. in Government from the University of Virginia, an M.A. in political philosophy from Claremont Graduate University, and a B.A. from the University of Dallas. Patrick has been a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University and at the Program on Constitutional Government at Harvard University. He has published in a variety of scholarly and popular journals, and his research has been funded by United States government agencies and the Social Science Research Council. His current project is a book manuscript titled Disasters and the Democratic State: How Bureaucrats, Politicians, and the Public Prepare for the Unexpected.

 

Anthony Santoro, Ph.D.

TA History

Anthony Santoro graduated from the University of Virginia in 1999 with a B.A. in English and History. After spending a year in Iceland and several more working in both the private and non-profit sectors, he moved to Heidelberg to join the first MAS program. After completing the MAS, Anthony began his doctoral work at the HCA under the supervision of Prof. Dr. Manfred Berg. The author of several scholarly articles and essays, including “The Prophet in His Own Words: Nat Turner’s Biblical Construction,” an article adapted from his MAS thesis that was published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography in 2008, Anthony has published and taught on First, Sixth and Eighth Amendment case law; the links between sports and religion in the U.S.; and the American death penalty. His first book is Exile and Embrace: Contemporary Religious Discourse on the Death Penalty (Northeastern University Press, Spring 2013).

 

Styles Sass, M.A.

TA Literature

Styles Sass received his bachelor's degree in English from the University of Iowa.  After teaching in the Basque country of Northern Spain, he moved to Germany, where he was awarded several writing fellowships and published a collection of poetry and prose pieces titled More Than These Few Days.  For his master's degree in American Studies at Heidelberg University, he wrote on the intersection of literature and politics in presidential campaign narratives. He lives in Stuttgart where he works as a writer, editor, and teacher.

 

Daniel Silliman, M.A.

Methodology

Daniel Silliman is an instructor in American religion at Heidelberg University. He studied philosophy at Hillsdale College in Michigan, where he completed two B.A. thesis projects, one on the possibility of a linguistic solution to the mind-body problem, and another on “Death of God” theology. He earned an M.A. in American Studies from the University of Tübingen, writing a master’s thesis entitled, “Sacred Signs in a Secular Sky: The Problem of Pluralism in Apocalyptic Evangelical Fiction.” He is building on that project for his Ph.D., researching how pluralism functions in contemporary evangelical faith fiction. He also worked for several years as a journalist, reporting on crime for a daily newspaper south of Atlanta, Georgia.

 

Jonathan Skolnik, Ph.D.

Visiting Professor of Judaic Studies

 

Alexander Vazansky

History

Alexander Vazansky studied History and American Literature at the Universities of Heidelberg and Miami University, Ohio. He received his Master of Arts from Miami University. He wrote his MA Thesis about “American Perceptions of Postwar Germany.” He worked as a TA for the Curt-Engelhorn-Chair of American History. Furthermore, he was a Lecturer for German as a Foreign Language at the University of Heidelberg and Yale University. He wrote his dissertation in history on: “An Army in Crisis: Social Conflicts in the United States Army, Europe and 7th Army, 1968-1975.”

 

Alec Walen

Law

Alec Walen has a J.D. from Harvard Law School (1998) and a Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of Pittsburgh (1993). He was recently a guest professor at the Institute for Philosophy at RWTH Aachen. He is a visiting scholar at the Max Planck Institute for Law. Before that he was an Associate Professor in the Division of Legal, Ethical, and Historical Studies at the University of Baltimore. His most recent publication is “Unconstitutional Detention of Nonresident Aliens: Revisiting the Supreme Court’s Treatment of the Law of War in Hamdi v. Rumsfeld” forthcoming in the Heidelberg Journal of International Law. His general research interests are in constitutional law, and moral, political, and legal philosophy.

 

Prof. Mark R. Wilson

History

Mark R. Wilson is visiting HCA from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, where he is an associate professor of history. He received his Ph.D. in 2002, from the University of Chicago. He is a specialist in the history of U.S. military-industrial relations. In 2004-05, he held a postdoctoral fellowship at the Olin Institute for Strategic Studies, at Harvard University. His first book, The Business of Civil War, was published in 2006, by the Johns Hopkins University Press. He is now completing a book about the business and politics of the U.S. industrial mobilization for World War II. In 2012-13, he held a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Professor Wilson is presently serving as a trustee of the Business History Conference.

 

 

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Latest Revision: 2016-09-28
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